Content curation

A curator used to be a guy who showed you around a museum, now we can all curate and your museum is the internet…sort of.

Here are some recent experiments I have been doing with content curation tools.

Paper.li

I created this to highlight stories tweeted about the NHS and NHS reform. It is updated every day and tweeted out to @TargetMD’s followers. It took maybe 30 seconds to put together and will keep going forever (or at least until the internet breaks or I turn it off)

Scoop.it

I think this is my favourite, takes a bit more effort in that you find the content yourself, although it does make suggestions for you (others can chip in too) and is really easy to customise. I started using scoop it because I was so impressed by Beth Kanter’s curation about the subject of curation itself. So far I have been messing around with two subjects, my social media workshop and recent Facebook changes.

Storify

This is sort of half way between the two above in terms of customisation and ease of use and is in the format of a timeline or story. I particularly like it when people use storify to cover an event, like the Guardian did and the Institute of Fundraising’s National Conference and not just because I’m in it! (I blogged about the conference here). My 1st ever storify was the story for my preparation for the special media workshop.

What’s great about this is how easy it is to share, you can tweet all the people in your story to tell them that they are in it; I got a nice few RTs and comments about this one which was very pleasing for a first go.

Most of what I know, or think I know, about content curation has been gleaned from Beth Kanter and Howard Lake. So thanks to them for sharing and I recommend you follow what they are up to learn more.

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About medavep
I work in the UK charity sector and sometimes I blog about fundraising, digital and consumer experience. Sometimes I just moan.

6 Responses to Content curation

  1. Pingback: #MDCNC Muscular Dystrophy Campaign National Conference « medavep

  2. Howard Lake says:

    Thanks Dave. Always nice to be included in the same breath as Beth Kanter.

    You don’t need me to tell you you are absolutely right about the importance of content curation, but equally that it is early days for many charities. Maybe in a year or so we’ll see some really powerful uses of it as they take it on board.

    Meanwhile, let’s spread the word!

    The tools available are developing very quickly. Just noticed that the trusted delicious.com has revamped itself to look alot more like scoop.it and pinterest.com, with its more graphical stacks. Of course, I’ve gone ahead and created one on content curation for charities:

    http://delicious.com/stacks/view/HkFSz6#m=grid

    I’ll be running my new How charities can curate digital content course again soon in London, and have already added your

    http://www.scoop.it/t/mdcnc-social-media-workshop

    as an example.

    • medavep says:

      Thanks Howard (very fast response by the way!) I spotted your delicious stack on the train this morning actually, it didn’t work so well on my phone (HTC Desire) though. What I’m still getting my head around is which tool to use for what and how to carry on the day job and integrate some curation into it in the most efficient way possible. If I crack that, I’ll blog about it.

  3. Howard Lake says:

    That’s handy to know re the phone. Yes, curation on the move is doubtless going to become the standard method of curating, so tools that help you do that are going to be very important. It’s enough for me just to try and keep up with the desktop/laptop tools at present!

    Yes, which tool to use. I have a bad feeling that we’re going to be using several, each better suited to a particular activity. As you blog post pointed out, Storify seems well suited to events, like live-blogging, whereas Scoop.it wouldn’t function as well like that.

  4. Pingback: Social media workshop for #MDCNC « medavep

  5. Pingback: You don’t need a microsite, you need a message! « medavep

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